I Love you but i've chosen darkness

I’ve never belonged anywhere that I’ve found myself. It’s been a frustrating reality of mine that I’ve learned to embrace. I belong on the periphery because that’s where I find myself in every single aspect of my life. I’ve found, repeatedly, that I can do nothing about this so I’ve stopped trying. No allegiance, just enthusiasm, interest, insight, passion, and necessity takes me where I’ve got to go.

— David Sylvian2004


oldhollywood:

Catherine Deneuve in Repulsion (1965, dir. Roman Polanski) (via)
"My aim was to show Carole’s hallucinations through the eye of the camera, augmenting their impact by using wide-angle lenses of progressively increasing scope. But in itself, that wasn’t sufficient for my purpose. I also wanted to alter the actual dimensions of the apartment — to expand the rooms and passages and push back the walls so that audiences could experience the full effect of Carole’s distorted vision.  
Accordingly we designed the walls of the set so they could be moved outward and elongated by the insertion of extra panels. When ‘stretched’ in this way, for example, the narrow passage leading to the bathroom assumed nightmarish proportions.”
-Polanski, quoted in Roman (1984)
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oldhollywood:

Catherine Deneuve in Repulsion (1965, dir. Roman Polanski) (via)

"My aim was to show Carole’s hallucinations through the eye of the camera, augmenting their impact by using wide-angle lenses of progressively increasing scope. But in itself, that wasn’t sufficient for my purpose. I also wanted to alter the actual dimensions of the apartment — to expand the rooms and passages and push back the walls so that audiences could experience the full effect of Carole’s distorted vision.  

Accordingly we designed the walls of the set so they could be moved outward and elongated by the insertion of extra panels. When ‘stretched’ in this way, for example, the narrow passage leading to the bathroom assumed nightmarish proportions.”

-Polanski, quoted in Roman (1984)


bbcradio3:

Happy birthday Radiophonic Workshop! Not the first specialist electronic music studio in the world, but one of the most innovative and certainly the most influential. Even if you’ve never heard of it, the sounds the Workshop inserted into the British sonic landscape over the four decades of its life will be familiar to you.

The Workshop got started in its Maida Vale home on this day in 1958, although its various engineers and artists had been working together for some time. Naturally enough, the Third Programme was critical to the early history of the workshop and the one of the earliest programmes to make use of its exotic, synthetic sounds was a fifty-minute ‘radiophonic poem’ by BBC radio drama producer Frederick Bradnum (that’s him in the bottom photo), broadcast in October of the previous year (earlier still was a Third Programme Beckett commission). In the pictures you’ll see Daphne Oram, Donald McWhinnie, Desmond Briscoe, Richard Bird and Frederick Bradnum. Click the pictures for the original, more detailed, captions.

Here’s a useful history of the Workshop and an article about the female composers and engineers of the Workshop.


heidisaman:

image

"All my life I’ve been harassed by questions: Why is something this way and not another? How do you account for that? This rage to understand, to fill in the blanks, only makes life more banal. If we could only find the courage to leave our destiny to chance, to accept the fundamental mystery of our lives, then we might be closer to the sort of happiness that comes with innocence."

- Luis Buñuel

Stills from The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972, dir. Luis Buñuel)


wandrlust:

"We are all faced throughout our lives with agonizing decisions. Moral choices. Some are on a grand scale. Most of these choices are on lesser points. But! We define ourselves by the choices we have made. We are in fact the sum total of our choices. Events unfold so unpredictably, so unfairly, human happiness does not seem to have been included, in the design of creation. It is only we, with our capacity to love, that give meaning to the indifferent universe. And yet, most human beings seem to have the ability to keep trying, and even to find joy from simple things like their family, their work, and from the hope that future generations might understand more." — Crimes and Misdemeanors (Woody Allen, 1989) 
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wandrlust:

"We are all faced throughout our lives with agonizing decisions. Moral choices. Some are on a grand scale. Most of these choices are on lesser points. But! We define ourselves by the choices we have made. We are in fact the sum total of our choices. Events unfold so unpredictably, so unfairly, human happiness does not seem to have been included, in the design of creation. It is only we, with our capacity to love, that give meaning to the indifferent universe. And yet, most human beings seem to have the ability to keep trying, and even to find joy from simple things like their family, their work, and from the hope that future generations might understand more."Crimes and Misdemeanors (Woody Allen, 1989)